Author Archive

The Pascack Valley Line – New Information #1

In 1996, Wilson E. Jones published The Pascack Valley Line, a history of the railroad that now runs from Secaucus, NJ, through Hillsdale, NJ to terminate at Spring Valley, NY. This article is an addendum to the book, not a reprinting of it. You can find copies on Alibris or eBay, but an interlibrary loan will get you a free read.

Let’s start with an updated roster for the nineteenth century roads. This information comes from R. H. Lehmuth’s outstanding collection of builder’s records:

2018 Updated Roster of the Hackensack & New York/New Jersey & New York Railroads

Hackensack & New York Railroad

Builder #

Gauge

Complete

Details

Cylinders

Drivers

Rogers 963

72"

9/1860

4-2-0T "Hackensack"
Became Erie #5 > #92 > #448

9×16

54"

 

Std.

 

Rebuilt – 4-2-0T Erie #448

12×16

54"

Rogers 969

72"

10/1860

4-2-0T "Lodi"

9×16

54"

 

Std.

 

Rebuilt – Erie "Lodi"

12×16

54"

Unknown

72"

1860?

4-4-0 "Bergen" Drove into Hackensack River 1861, probably still there. Described as "large" and "first-class".

?

?

Unknown

72"

1861

4-4-0 "Jersey City" Wilson attributes this machine to the Jersey City Locomotive & Machine Co. Unfortunately, there is no record of such a locomotive and they didn’t build any engines at all in 1860 or 1861.

?

?

Rogers 1467

72"

5/1867

4-4-0 "Hackensack" This locomotive was unknown to Wilson E. Jones and Raymond Bessey, an earlier writer on the NJ&NYRR. On page A2 of the book, locomotive #5 is mislabelled as NJ&NY “Oradell”. It is likely this engine, H&NY #5.

14×22

60"

Lodi Branch Railroad

Builder #

Gauge

Complete

Details

Cylinders

Drivers

Todd & Rafferty

72"

1860

2-4-0T #1

?

?

Rogers 1693

72"

12/1869

0-4-0T #2

12×18

34"

 

Std.

1885

Rebuilt to standard gauge by New York, Susquehanna & Western at their Wortendyke shops, then added to their roster.

 

 

New Jersey & New York Railroad

Builder #

Gauge

Complete

Details

Cylinders

Drivers

Rogers 2386

72"

12/1874

4-4-0 #1 "Hackensack" The third!

16×24

60"

Rogers 2387

72"

12/1874

4-4-0 #2 "Hillsdale"

16×24

60"

Rogers 2388

72"

12/1874

4-4-0 #3 "Haverstraw"

16×24

60"

 

 

 

Returned and rebuilt to standard gauge: A. S. Hewitt – for – New York & Greenwood Lake #5 "Ringwood", then Erie #323.

 

 

Rogers 2389

72"

12/1874

4-4-0 #4 "Carlstadt"

16×24

60"

 

 

4/1881

Returned and rebuilt to standard gauge, became New York, Woodhaven & Rockaway #5, then New York & Rockaway Beach #305, then Long Island #305.

16×24

60"

Rogers 2390

72"

12/1874

4-4-0 #5 "Oradell" The photo labeled as the Oradell on page A2 of the book is incorrect. The engine pictured is at least 5 years older than 1874 (D-shaped smokebox).

16×24

60"

Rogers 2391

72"

2/1875

4-4-0 #6 "Westwood"

16×24

60"

Rogers 2396

72"

2/1875

4-4-0 #7 "Nanuet"

16×24

60"

Rogers 2370

72"

2/1875

4-4-0 #8 "Spring Valley"

16×24

60"

 

 

7/1879

Returned and rebuilt to standard gauge: A. S. Hewitt – for – New York & Greenwood Lake #6 "Hansenclever".

16×24

60"

Rogers 3551

Std

4/1885

4-4-0 #9 "Carlstadt"

18×24

66"

Rogers 4390

Std

10/1890

2-6-0 #10 "Woodbridge", then Erie

19×24

54"

Cooke 2193

Std

4/8/1892

4-4-0 #11 "Haverstraw"

19×24

62"

Rogers 5038

Std

5/1895

4-4-0 #12 "Park Ridge", then Erie #12

18×24

64"

Based on R. H. Lehmuth’s builders records for "Rogers Locomotive 1837-1905", "Cooke Locomotive & Machine Co. 1853-1902" and "Jersey City Locomotive Works 1859-1867".

The iPhonarium

A new instrument I’ve developed over a year, the iPhonarium includes 4 interlinked iPhones, mini-keyboard controllers, a wind controller interface and an audio mixer, all in a small wooden box I can carry under my arm. This photo shows an early version, when it only had 1 keyboard:

An early version of the iPhonarium

In effect, I’m running 4 tiny computers each with 24 to 126 music apps on each. There are some really outstanding synth apps out there, covering every different type of sound generation, including my favorite, physical modelling. This gives me great flexibility plus redundancy: if one phone goes down, I can move to another in seconds.

The whole setup, including my amp, is battery-powered, so don’t matter if AC power is available or not. Here’s a video where I accompany poet Janet Hamill. This setup used voice harmonization and 2 keyboard-operated synths:

This synth can also be placed in the center of a small table and played by up to 4 people at once. That’s the Jam Station incarnation. I entered this in the 2016 New Jersey Makers Day and won $50 for “Best Thing That Makes Sound”!

The iPhonarium at New Jersey Makers Day, 2016